The American Dream

Band defines excellence during marching season

MARCHING+ON+Brass+players+Sheila+Stroud%2C+Zane+Biscoe%2C+Maddi+Pate%2C+Zach+Dommenge%2C+Matthew+Drum+perform+%22American+Tapestries%22+during+halftime+at+the+Pflugerville+game.
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The American Dream

MARCHING ON Brass players Sheila Stroud, Zane Biscoe, Maddi Pate, Zach Dommenge, Matthew Drum perform

MARCHING ON Brass players Sheila Stroud, Zane Biscoe, Maddi Pate, Zach Dommenge, Matthew Drum perform "American Tapestries" during halftime at the Pflugerville game.

MARCHING ON Brass players Sheila Stroud, Zane Biscoe, Maddi Pate, Zach Dommenge, Matthew Drum perform "American Tapestries" during halftime at the Pflugerville game.

MARCHING ON Brass players Sheila Stroud, Zane Biscoe, Maddi Pate, Zach Dommenge, Matthew Drum perform "American Tapestries" during halftime at the Pflugerville game.

Maddie Barker, Staffer

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    This year, the Rouse Band has made record-breaking strides, becoming 2A Class Champions at BOA Austin and following that up with second place and a 5A Class Championship at the Texas Marching Classic. For their 2018 show, students are performing “American Tapestries,” which they will execute for their final contest Nov. 2 at BOA San Antonio in the Alamodome.

     “Every competition so far has been tough, and BOA San Antonio is one of the hardest in the nation,” junior Izzy Penny said. “I feel that we can make finals though. It is always possible, no matter what band you come from.”

         At each competition, most of the LISD high schools perform. Students from each band support other schools from the district and create a sense of unity, which carries the students through competition season. Bands see each other’s show almost every weekend from August until  November.

     “Competitions such as BOA, are a great way for us to interact with old friends,” flute section leader Miranda Barker said. “ When we enter the field and look up in the stands to see Leander and Cedar Park chanting and cheering us on, even before we’ve performed, it gives us a great feeling. It is fun to support our other band programs and be supported back.”

     Drill instructor Sheila Stroud said judging 20 bands who each have a 7-9 minute show can get tedious, and it can be hard to not include bias or personal feelings towards certain programs.

     “I think BOA is very subjective, but there sometimes can be prejudice from other schools,” Stroud said. “I feel that judges who have seen how we’ve changed and grown over the past two years will have a slightly different perspective about us, but we can never tell, because the scores are based on how they are feeling on the day of competition.”

     Band directors have been making significant strides towards creating a successful legacy for future members of the program. With their Regional Championship win at BOA Austin, students are defining a path of excellence for the next contest in San Antonio.

     “After winning our class division at the first competition, I felt that the rest of the season would be success after success,” All-State musician Conor Casey said. “Mr. Robb and the directors have reached a new level, and it is exciting to experience. I cannot wait to see how the season finishes.”

     After making State UIL Finals with their 2017 show “Lotus,” the band has drawn more  attention this year. Judges and spectators are watching the group more closely and observing them compete in a different competition with a more visual style.

     “The judges aren’t just watching any band perform, they will be watching a State Finalist perform,” senior and drum major Maddy Moore said. “Their higher expectations will be in existence before we step on the field, and hopefully their excitement, too.”

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