The School Newspaper of Rouse High School

Raider Rumbler

Through it All: Stand By Me

Junior illustrates importance of friendships for disabled students, including physical, emotional, mental, intellectual and spiritual benefits

illustration by Jonathan Akene

illustration by Jonathan Akene

Amber Assad, Guest Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Being disabled is hard, because we are often misunderstood. It’s hard for us to make friends, but it’s easy for us to lose them because of our disabilities. People assume we don’t have any feelings or knowledge, because we are disabled.

Disabled people are their own worst enemy, because we don’t give ourselves enough credit when we accomplish simple things, such as walking or talking. Because we see everyone else doing these things with such ease, we believe we should be able to do the same daily activities as our friends.

Disabled people need friends because they help us in ways. When we have friends, they can help us physically, emotionally, mentally, intellectually and spiritually.

Let’s say someone is in a wheelchair, and other people are playing basketball. A basketball player notices the person in the wheelchair and brings a ball to the disabled child. Then, the player teaches the wheelchair child how to play basketball.

That gives us physical help, because disabled people have to exercise more often than regular people, and it helps us emotionally to feel like we’re important enough for someone to give us attention.

We start to realize that not all people are mean, or that others think negatively about people with disabilities. It also helps us intellectually, to have a conversation with someone who doesn’t have a disability. We learn about things they are learning about, that helps us accomplish something on a spiritual level.

Friends give us a reason to continue the fight. However, when we are ignored, we start to give up. If you are friends with a disabled person, and they normally talk to you a lot, but one day their talk is limited, don’t take it personally. Don’t leave them until they tell you what’s going on. People with disabilities need friends who won’t give up on them, even if they give up on themselves.

That’s all we need: true friends.

Print Friendly

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




*

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Life & Arts

    How To Survive in College

  • Through it All: Stand By Me

    Life & Arts

    Out of the Blue

  • Through it All: Stand By Me

    News/Events

    Senior places in Sculpture Contest

  • Through it All: Stand By Me

    Life & Arts

    The Travel Germ

  • Opinion

    When I Turn 18

  • Life & Arts

    Effects of Autism – Autism Awareness

  • Life & Arts

    Myth vs Fact – Autism Awareness

  • Through it All: Stand By Me

    Life & Arts

    The Musical Masterpiece

  • Through it All: Stand By Me

    Life & Arts

    Elena’s Story – Autism Awareness

  • Through it All: Stand By Me

    Life & Arts

    Robert’s Story – Autism Awareness

The School Newspaper of Rouse High School
Through it All: Stand By Me